Kitten the Pimp (pimp_kitten) wrote in halloweeeeen,
Kitten the Pimp
pimp_kitten
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A Virtual Tour of My 2002 Haunted House

While looking for pictures to use in the contest (I finally found some, but could not get my scanner working in time), I came across some pictures from a haunted house I designed in 2002 for a squadron fundraiser. In the spirit of Halloween, I thought I would share them. If anyone else has any haunted house stories/pics/tips to share, they would be much appreciated.

Sadly, all the pictures I could find were from the construction phase, so many are incomplete and work-lit. You'll have to use your imaginations for the actual haunted house lighting.


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The first, and by far the easiest scare in the haunted house was the spider hall. We wrapped clothing in bedsheets and tied them into roughly human shapes, hung them from the ceiling and draped them with spider webs (we spread them better than what you see in the picture here). We used green spider webbing and shone a black light down on them. Right before any group of guests started through the haunted house, a worker would give the three bundles a push, making them swing randomly. They were placed so that guests had to touch them to get by. Of course, most people thought that at least one of them would contain a real body that would jump at them, and when none did, they would invariably let their guard down. The next room had no fewer than five workers in all black that would press in on the guests in the darkness, creating a much more potent scare. I don't have any pictures of that, sadly, so let's move on to-
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This was the helmet and shoulder pads from my 1999 "space pig" costume (I have a better pic of that somewhere...) We attached it to the ceiling so that guests had to walk under it. When they did, smoke from a machine in the ceiling would shoot down at them. I have pictures of the next room, but the room was considered too offensive by some of the guests, and since I don't want to offend anyone here, I am omitting those pics. At the end of that next room was-
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This was part of my costume from 2000 (the next two shots are from 2000, just to give you an idea of the size of the costume). We mounted it to a rolling cart and slathered it with vaseline to make it look slimy. Guests had to walk directly toward this thing to get to the doorway to the graveyard. Of course, once they got to a certain point, a strobe light would kick on and a worker would charge the guests with the cart. More than once, we had to stop the haunted house to repair walls in this area, as guests kept panicking and running through them. Ahee! XD


These pictures give some sense of scale of the beast on the cart. That was one of my favorite costumes, despite the pain the stilts caused my feet (and the pain I caused for my friends-it took a crew of three to get me in and out of that thing safely!). In the head of the 'demon tree', as it came to be called, was a voice changer I spliced into a megaphone, allowing me to roar at people in the haunted house and later that night on the street. (The editing-out of my facial features and 'viktoly' graffiti compliments of jyuufish)
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This was one corner of a graveyard scene. I seem to have misplaced all of the graveyard pics save for this one and the following pic. There were many more tree branches in the final version. The fence also kept guests from falling into that square hole in the floor. We made good use of that, though...
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That head once belonged to a CPR dummy. It was painted with white and glow-in-the-dark paint. We affixed a white sheet to it and suspended it from the rope there. One of the workers stood behind the black plastic wall, and when guests would come by he would pull the rope; the guests would see a glowing ghost rise from out of the ground. This was my second favorite effect.
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Okay, to get the full effect of this, you need to imagine away the sea of Mountain Dew cans (we went through enough cases to build a maze out of the boxes!). When this room was completed, there was a cage full of screaming laboratory victims, alternating strobe lights, a fog machine and jyuufish thrashing around on the table screaming while our 'mad scientist' attacked her with various bloody tools.
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This was the cage where the tortured lab victims sat. It was originally a service corridor, allowing workers to work the microphone and smoke machine for the gargoyle (coming up) without being seen. But someone figured that as long as they were going to be there, they might as well use the space to help scare the guests. The cage door was surprisingly sturdy, but it wobbled like mad when you shook it. Guests had to walk between the cage and the lab table, and the victims would shake the cage wall at them when they passed.
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Another view of the cage (from the inside). The gargoyle (it's coming, really) sat right above the cage. Notice the Mountain Dew can. *sigh*
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Upon leaving the laboratory, guests would walk down this empty hall. At the end it turned to the right into the gargoyle's lair. However, there was a surprise in this hall. If you look closely, you can see a cable running overhead that disappears into a hole on the far wall. In the dark, of course, you would not see it.
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This was connected to the cable. Once the first guest in each group reached the halfway point of the hallway, a worker behind the far wall would throw the head at the guests. It was on a wheel, so it glided toward them smoothly, and we soaked the mop head in water, so it would drip on the guests as it passed overhead.
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Ah, the gargoyle. This guy was a blast to make. He was life-size (about 5'9", we figured), with a frame of chicken wire. We melted garbage bags over the frame with a heat gun (you can see where we missed a few spots.) We used jelly eyes and plastic vampire fangs for its face. I don't know who painted it, but it looked good under the green light.
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Another picture of the gargoyle. He sat on top of the prisoner cage, and we built the plastic up around him so that guests wuold pass him later on the route through the haunted house. We rigged a smoke machine up through his tail to blow smoke out of his mouth, but it proved too dangerous (smoke machines get HOT!). We opted for just setting the machine behind some of the branches next to him. We also had the voice-changer/megaphone rig from the old demon tree costume hooked up behind the gargoyle, so that when the lab victims would shriek from their cage, guests in the gargoyle hallway would hear its inhuman roars.
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This is a picture of the wall beneath the gargoyle. There's not a lot to it, but I added it to illustrate how we decorated most of the walls of the haunted house. Cheap and effective!
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The final scare! If any of you remember reading my introduction post, this was the thing I was talking about. This skull stood about five feet tall and was anchored to a 4x4 suspended from the ceiling. Guests had to walk past an open archway to exit our section of the haunted house, and when they did, the same worker that threw the head at them would swing this skull down, letting the cross-beam bash into the frame of the archway, creating a lot of noise and driving more than one guest out of the haunted house completely. You can see by the cracks in the skull that paper mache is not the best material to use for this effect. The repeated crashes took their toll on the skull. Still, this remained my favorite part of the haunted house.


Thank you for letting me take you on this virtual tour. That was a great year for the squadron haunted house. And this was only my section! After they left my area, there were four others of approximately equal length. All told, it took guests about ten minutes to navigate the entire haunted house.
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